Fastastic article about the anatomical and biomechanical consequences of jump heights in dog agility.

I believe this article fully supports what can been SEEN when watching dogs jump and more importantly LAND while running agility.  It also explains why Dawn Weaver and I named our jump retraining program “Hit the Ground Running!” vs “Hit the Ground… with a Thunk.”  🙂

Summary-of-Anatomical-and-Biomechanical-Consequences-of-differing-jump-heights-in-Dog-Agility
The article also supports something that seems rather obvious.. that repetitive jumping takes its toll on ALL dogs over time, regardless of how well they are built for the task and how important it is to help our dogs learn to jump with as much ease as possible and in a style that are appropriate for each dog’s structure so they land with the minimal amount of impact as possible.

1 thought on “Fastastic article about the anatomical and biomechanical consequences of jump heights in dog agility.

  1. We have an expression in the horse world…..a horse is born with just so many jumps in him. The great ones have more than the average and hence the career results. If you follow hounds as I do, you don’t “lark” finding fences to jump for fun….you might need that one in your horse when things get serious. Teaching a horse to use and improve his natural ability keeps him sound and safe….same things in dogs!

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