A few of Jake and Lil’s runs at Sharon Nelson’s Seminar and Fun Raiser in Moab, Utah

(above) Lil’s Touch N Go Bonus Box run, April 17, 2015

After 3 days running Jake and Lil during Sharon Nelson’s Seminar, I was curious to see how they would run on the 4th day in a row, especially Jake since I am thinking about running him at Champs which is a 4 day event and he has never done four days of agility in a row.  He did very well at the seminar.  The couple of times he lost focus he quickly got it right back.   However, at the Fun Raiser Trial (day 4), he lost focus and did not come right back.  This was very disheartening for me because we have been working on this issue on and off for most of the 8 years Jake has been part of our family.  I think four days in a row played a role in his not coming right back but I think having more open space around the courses during the Fun Raiser contributed too.   During the seminar, participants tended to sit close to the action to be able to hear Sharon’s feedback.  Once the chairs were removed the arena looked noticeably larger to me and I assume it looked more expansive to Jake as well.  Since Champs is held in a HUGE arena, I am still on the fence about whether I think Jake will be able to stay focused or not at Champs.

As you can see in Lil’s Bonus Box run above, she ran very well on Day 4.  She loved the firm dirt footing in this horse arena.  I did too!   Lil has had a very reliable running A-Frame for a few years now.  The reason I am asking for a stop (4on) is because this A-Frame is 8′ vs. 9′ and she does not automatically adjust her striding so lately I have been playing around with stopped contacts sometimes and running contacts other times (like when the A-Frame is 9′).  So far she does not appear to be confused by mixing things up.

(above) One of Lil’s runs at Sharon Nelson’s Seminar.   Handlers got to pick their own Bonus Box positions.  It was great to be able to look at the course challenges and to determine where I wanted to be to meet those challenges.

(above) One of Jake’s runs during Sharon Nelson’s Seminar.   He had been running  full courses up to that point without losing focus.  But since I wanted Sharon to see what he looks like when he does lose focus, I asked if we could run the course again, which I thought might him to lose focus.  The video shows what Jake typically does when he loses focus.  The feedback I got from Sharon was similar feedback I got from Sue Sternberg many years ago… that Jake is not stressed or demotivated by anything I’m doing.  He was just distracted by something that caught his attention.  If I had to guess what he is thinking it would be something like: “I know where we are going next!”… then “Whats that?”… then “I know where we are going next!” then  “But what was that?” then in this case  “I know where we are going next!”

The thing I need to figure out is how to change my emotional state when he loses focus and does not come right back.   If I can remain emotionally neutral, he responds better than when I stress out about it, which he picks up on and makes the situation worse.  Sharon gave me some good solid advice about what to do when Jake loses focus and I will be doing my best to “keep my head” so Jake can “keep his head.”  Time will tell if I am successful.

(above) Lil running Extreme Barrelers at the Fun Raiser the day after the seminar. She earned a 15 point Q (points are based on the dog’s speed) which earned her Novice Title with an extra 5 points to spare.   Lil has always turned incredibly tight.  You can see how she makes 90 degree turns out of each tunnel and also how tightly she turns around barrels which cut her yardage significantly.

I love running more than one dog.  Jake is a total blast to run when he is ON but its great having a dog like Lil who is ON 99% of the time and super fun to run too.  Lil helps me keep everything in perspective.

Week One with Takoda

What a busy week it has been since Takoda joined our family one week ago.   It has been so interesting to see him change so much from day to day, both physically and mentally.

I don’t have a rigid training plan in mind but I do know what is most important to me… and that is peace and harmony in our home.   I was so happy to see how well Jake and Lil did from the first time they met Takoda.

(above) Jake and Lil meet Takoda for the first time, when he stopped by for a visit on March 23, 2015

(above) A couple days later, he came back for another visit and I decided to introduce a little movement by  walking around the yard.   More movement equals more arousal so I didn’t get too crazy moving around.

(above) First group feeding session on Takoda’s first day living with us full time, one week ago.

I didn’t plan to feed them all together on Day 1 but Bruce took forever to come outside with the video camera, so I needed to do something since they were all three milling around.  I was blown away that Jake and Lil allowed me to feed another dog.  I was equally impressed with Takoda’s calm and thoughtful attitude… and this was after he had just learned to take food when offered in a few short sessions on his own.

One very funny thing was the more I praised Takoda for taking a piece of kibble, the more enthusiastic he became about eating the next piece.  I had to wonder what alternate universe  he was from?  HA HA but seriously, my terriers never needed any encouragement or praise to take food with a nice level of enthusiasm.  This is one of many differences I’m noticing about Takoda. Very fun!

(above)  First time working with Mark buckets, March 30.  I had already introduced Takoda to Mark buckets on his own but he had just done a handful of reps before this session.

In day to day life, one thing was immediately clear and impossible to ignore… Takoda liked to scream when I left him alone and he screamed even louder when I tried to work with Jake or Lil.   I wasn’t sure what I was going to do about this but I knew I had to do something and what better day than April Fools Day to try to stop his terrible screaming.

I started by putting Takoda in an Expen next to 12 weave poles with mark buckets beyond so Jake and Lil would have something to drive towards and wait on to give me a chance to reward Takoda for being calm and quiet before rewarding Jake and Lil.   I didn’t have a lot of confidence this would work but it worked brilliantly!

I started off tossing a dozen or so pieces of kibble in the Expen and while Takoda scavenged around, I ran Jake and Lil through the weave poles.  When Takoda looked up and noticed the action, I tossed in a few more pieces before he had a chance to start screaming.    After that, all it took to keep him quiet was praise and walking over to the Expen to give him a piece of kibble each time Jake or Lil ran by in the poles.

April 1 set up in yard to promote quiet and calm behavior when other dogs are workingSince that went so well, I continued by sending Jake and Lil through four hoops in various patterns. Between each rep, I praised and rewarded Takoda for being a good quiet boy.  Jake and Lil had a blast working at a distance…. and it was also fun for me to be able to practice handling BACKs.IMG_3186I didn’t assume this strategy would work the next day, but figured there was no harm in trying so this morning I set up 3 Mark buckets, put Takoda in his Expen, and followed the same protocol as the day before. On a side note, I was amazing by how much variety there is running 2 dogs between 3 buckets.  It was like we were playing Three Card Monty!  🙂  Today’s session went as well as yesterday’s session.  I am very happy to have been such a fool thinking it wouldn’t work.  🙂

(above) Takoda’s first time working on multiple Marks.. the third Mark is not visible, April 2.

After being such a good boy watching Jake and Lil work,  it was now Takoda’s turn to do something fun. I spontaneously decided to use the 3 Mark buckets out in the yard to see what he would do.  Prior he had only worked close to a single bucket.  I added the low platform in the middle of the Marks to add variety and a different performance (4 feet on).

My intention was mostly to see if he understood that he should move in the direction I am moving and face the direction I am facing.  This was a priority for me because his out-of-the-box behavior was to “herd from the front” like his amazing father.  While that works very well herding cattle and sheep, it was insanely dangerous to have him running in front and under my feet every time I moved.  So all week long, I had been careful to only reward him in heel position or when he was behind me facing the direction I was facing… and POOF…. he stopped tripping me up and started offering heel position when following me around the house and yard.   He even started staying in heel position when playing with toys… with my encouragement.  I cannot believe how quickly a puppy’s behaviors can change.  I assume this is because all behaviors are not well rehearsed with little puppies.

I feel fortunate to have been able to start interacting with Takoda so early in his life.  I met him for the first time at 5 weeks old.. and continued to visit with him a couple times a week until he came to live with us full time at 8 weeks old.  He is the perfect puppy for me.  We are already fully in love.  Gush Gush Gush. 🙂

(above) Just in case you think its all work and no play, Takoda spends a vast majority of every day being a very happy and cute puppy.  This short video is of him reenacting a scene from the move “Alien.”  HA HA

Please excuse typos and bad grammar.  I’m BUSY.  HA HA

 

Lil earned her Versatility NATCH at Mountain Dog Sports Trial, February 27, 2015

Lil's V-NATCH photo with Judge Ron Young.

Lil’s V-NATCH photo with Judge Ron Young.

(above) Lil’s Versatility NATCH photo with Judge Ron Young.   It was cool that Lil earned this Championship Title under a judge who knew us from the East Coast.

I didn’t feel any pressure about this run being for Lil’s V-NATCH, because Lil runs Weavers courses well.  The only reason we lacked Elite Weaver’s Qs is I tend not to enter this class when it is offered late in the day on Sundays, which seemed to be fairly common on the East Coast (this is not a complaint though). I just personally prefer to run Elite Weavers (3 sets of 12 poles) with a fresh dog.   But since moving to Colorado in July, I’ve found many trials offer Weavers on Fridays, so we were able to get 8 needed Elite Weavers Qs (for a total of 13) over the past 6 months.

(above) Lil’s Versatility NATCH run at Mountain Dog Sports on Friday.

Elite Weavers was the first class of the trial.   Lil was acting tentative outside the ring so I ran this course with as much enthusiasm as I could muster, thinking Lil would appreciate feeling that type of energy to avoid feeling bogged down by the soft, deep dirt or feeling concerned about the environment which smelled strongly of horse poop and pee (Yucko).  Lil got her Boogie On about half way through the first set of poles and finished well under SCT.  She ran incredibly well all weekend long, Q-ing 11 of 14 runs and as usual the few NQs were due to handler errors.  I was (and am) so happy because this was the first trial at this site where Lil felt like her confident little self.  🙂

(above) Lil running Elite Touch N Go on Saturday

By Day 2 of the trial, Lil felt entirely confident when entering the horse arena. The tentativeness I felt on Day 1 and at previous trials at this site was gone.  I loved how tightly she wrapped the hoop and barrel. If you watch her wrap the hoop, you can see she was so tight, she had to hop over the timer foot.  🙂

(above)  Lil running Elite Regular on Sunday

This is one of my favorite runs of the weekend BECAUSE we NQed early on.  The turn after the dog walk seemed so easy on Round 1, that I took it for granted on Round 2. I guess I forgot it was easy on Round 1 because I handled it vs. stood there facing the tunnel while watching Lil run into it. Duh!  But as a result of this early off-course tunnel, I decided to run the rest of the course from a self-imposed handling box. Lil aced it…and she looked like she LOVED the distance.  🙂

(above) Lil running Elite Chances Round 1 on Sunday

Having recently participated in Paula Goss’s Advanced Distance workshop, I knew exactly how I wanted to handle Chances courses this weekend.  I knew WHERE I wanted to be, and WHEN I wanted to be there to show my dog the correct path ahead.  I handled Round 1 and 2 the same way with Lil and Jake and both dogs ran the course beautifully.

(above) Lil running Elite Chances Round 1

(above) Lil running Elite Chances Round 2

(above) Jake running Open Chances Round 1

I made the same mistake with Jake both rounds and pulled him off a hoop but I was so happy with how well he ran this course both rounds.  This was a tough weekend for Jake.  He found the temptation of huge mounds of horse poop along the one side and the back of the arena to be too much to resist on about half of his runs.   But on Sunday, I only lost him to horse poop on one run.

(above) Jake running Open Chances Round 2

(above) Lil running Elite Chances on Friday

The Chances course on Friday was one of the most challenging courses I’ve encountered.  There was only one Q in the entire Elite class.   Lil didn’t Q due our only missed dog walk / tunnel discrimination of the weekend, but I loved how well she ran the uniquely challenging portions of this course.  The coolest thing for me was that I knew exactly WHERE I wanted to be to send her out to 2 jumps after the second tunnel….which was as far away as possible from the tunnel exit when she emerged.  My plan worked beautifully.

Another challenge I felt really good about was the left turn after the first tunnel.  Once again, I knew WHERE I needed to be.. and WHEN I needed to be there in order to pre-cue that left turn before Lil ran into that first tunnel.  Plus she totally aced running through the “box” in the center of the course twice.  The first time was straight through 2 hoops to the far entrance to the purple tunnel.  The second time was from the exit of the purple tunnel OUT to the jump.

(above) Jake’s Open Chances Q on Friday

Jake Q-ed this very challenging Chances course in Open, which was particularly challenging for him due to the proximity to huge mounds of horse poop in that area of the ring.   I almost lost him twice.  The Q was saved by the Open line having a narrow channel in which the handler could walk in front of the tunnel, which helped me coax him back into “working mode.”

Jake’s contacts were PERFECT all weekend long.  So were his tunnel/ contact discriminations.  There were many things to feel good about which helped balance out numerous Es due to Jake wolfing down huge mouthfuls of horse poop.   SIGH.  Good thing we don’t need no stinkin’ Qs.   HA HA and true!

A few of Lil’s runs at Paula Goss’s Advanced Distance Workshop in Phoenix, AZ

(above)  a few of Lil’s runs plus Jake’s run during a lunch break from Paula Goss’s Advanced Distance Workshop.

Paula Goss is a fantastic agility instructor.  She has a great eye and set up challenging courses that could be worked from a variety of distances so each team was challenged yet not over-faced.  She also shared some great tips for training and course analysis.  I left the workshop with fresh ideas for what I want to practice at home.

I really don’t know how she kept going and going and going….like the energizer bunny for 3 days straight…. especially because it was HOT and SUNNY.   Amazing!  Plus her vibe is so upbeat and fun AND her demos of handling moves are inspiring to see and then try to mimic.  Paula’s handling is precise and graceful, yet totally punchy and dramatic when it needs to be.  I have a long way to go before I will be capable of handling anywhere close to Paula’s level but I am totally jazzed about trying.

Enough about me!   Lil was a real trooper.  She approached every course with great energy and speed and gave it her all.   I was thrilled to see how much her distance skills have improved this past year.  What used to be a GET OUT is usually now a simple GO ON and she appeared to be 100% confident working at HUGE distances.   But as we all know, agility is a game of balance, and as Paula pointed out on numerous occasions, Lil’s COME INS/ Turns towards me, especially to the left are a bit weak right now.   I am confident we’ll regain our balance as a team and in the mean time I’m 100% fine having some off-courses when working at a distance since the benefit of having developed such a solid GO ON far outweighs a few lost Qs!    Qs…. Shmoos is what I say.  🙂

 

 

New Multi-dimensional Doggie Luge Track

Jake and Lil are so confident running big loops with great speed and distance, I decided to try something new.  Instead of a digging out a simple circular luge track with a bisecting line, I designed a track that would allow us to practice GO ONs, GET OUTs, as well as a variety of tighter and wider TURNS.

On a side note, the A-frame can be incorporated if the grass is dry or barricaded if the grass or contacts are slippery.

There are 2 more loops in my grand design 🙂  but that part of the yard has a lot of heavy snow so digging will have to wait until the snow melts down a bit.  Plus there are plenty of fun options to explore with the current set-up.

(above) an overview of the track design

(above) one of Lil’s reps

(above) one of Jake’s reps

(above) another one of Lil’s reps

A few of Jake and Lil’s runs at NADAC Trials in Arizona

What a nice break from winter we all had in Arizona attending 2 NADAC Trials and a 3-day distance workshop with Paula Goss, which I’ll be writing about in a separate post.

Here are a few of Jake and Lil’s runs.  They both ran so well on turf and stayed perfectly clean.  What a nice change of pace from running in horse arenas around Boulder.

(above) Lil Elite Jumpers Bonus Box

Lil ran a great Jumpers Bonus Box course on February 1, which happened to be her 6th Birthday. I could not be more proud of her.  She ran with full confidence and really nice speed. Feel free to MUTE the audio. I was a total blabber mouth but Lil is used to me doing that and ran really really well in spite of it….. or maybe because of it (GASP)!

Too bad I didn’t believe we’d make it through a couple of tricky turns when I walked the course because had I formulated a handling plan for that last turn away from me towards the closing line, I may not have been SO LATE and I think Lil might have gotten it.   In the future, when my handling fails, I hope I can resist the temptation to jump in and finish the course running with Lil.   I need to remember I can just take a few steps and continue working at a distance.  Regardless, I feel GREAT about this Bonus Box attempt and based on the huge round of applause and YAHOOing Lil earned, I think our fellow competitors agreed.  🙂

(above) Jake Open Touch N Go

Jake’s new 4-on contacts were stellar and he earned his Open Touch N Go Title.  The only time he didn’t stick a contact was when a disconnect occurred between us earlier on course.  He still hit within the contact zone but since stopping 4-on is now part of our criteria, I asked him to return to a 4-on once as a test.  It seemed to have a calming affect on him.  After a brief pause and praise, I released him and he appeared completely centered, reengaged, and I could tell he did not perceive it as punishment.  If I had to guess, he experienced it as a reset (physically and mentally) and he finished the course running beautifully.  I wish I had a video of that run.

(above) Lil Elite Touch N Go

I have been playing around with asking for 4-0n the A-frame with Lil but after seeing her response at this trial, or should I say lack of response over the first two A-frames at our first trial since training a 4-on, I decided I didn’t like it for her.  I think her long history of running over A-frames trumped her short history (under a month) of stopping 4-on and I really didn’t like how it caused her to shorten her striding down the A-frame which made her dismount higher.  So instead of trying to “make her stop” and potentially creating an issue with Lil and the A-frame, I decided to just say GO ON like I always have and she went back to her typical style of running over A-frames.

For the record, the only reason I had contemplated switching Lil from running to 4-on was because NADAC trials can have 8′ or 9′ A-frames and Lil doesn’t automatically adjust her striding when she goes from 9′ (at trials around Boulder) to 8′ (in Southwest Colorado and at Champs).   A stopped contact would have saved us the hassle of needing to train a few sessions on 8′ A-frames before we encounter those shorter A-frames in trials.. and at Champs, which is not convenient since I don’t have an 8′ A-frame.  Oh well.  Its not the worse thing in the world.

(above) Jake Open Weavers

I almost scratched Jake’s last two runs after he lost focus on a Chances course mid-day.  I thought he was mentally done but I’m glad I changed my mind because he finished up the day with two fantastic runs, including this Open Weaver’s course.  Jake has a bunch of Open Weaver’s Qs.  The reason I have not moved him up to Elite is because I don’t think he needs to weave three sets of 12 poles and Open Weavers has two sets of 6 and only one set of 12.

(above) Lil Elite Weavers

Too bad the video starts mid-course because Lil ran the opener super fast and weaved the first set of poles much faster than she has been weaving lately.  I have wondered why her weaving has slowed down this past year.  Is it mental?  physical?  emotional?  Or maybe its due to weave pole bases being a little wider than the poles we train on at home.  Regardless, I was very pleased with how well she ran this course.

(above) Jake Elite Tunnelers

Jake has been running so well lately, I ran him very similar to the way I ran Lil in Tunnelers and Weavers… just a few feet less in terms of distance but the same basic handling.  YEY Jake!

(above) Lil Elite Tunnelers

Lil ran this course beautifully with me mostly staying inside a self-imposed Handler’s Box.  I lost my nerve while leading out and released her before I got to my intended position but other than that, I stayed in my box, and Lil ran with full confidence. YEY Lil!

It was so much fun to run agility outdoors and to reconnect with friends from Champs and Yellowstone Dog Sports. Plus I love having Sarah Fix as a judge.  She always creates such a fun, upbeat vibe and this trial was no exception.  Also agility folks in Phoenix are very welcoming.  We’ll be back next winter for sure.

 

 

 

 

Warming up with a barrel and 2 buckets then doing a few A-Frames

I am LOVING what I’m seeing on the A-frame from both dogs.   Stopping with four feet on (4-on) looks easy for them to do.

I can see that Jake knows his job and is preparing to stop the entire descent with no hesitation before reaching the bottom.  The way he is performing 4-on looks much easier on his body than jumping off from high in the contact zone (his natural MO) and I think 4-on might even be lessening the force in which he hits the up ramp due to early anticipation of the stop at the bottom.

This morning’s session focused on distance.  I wanted to test Jake and Lil’s understanding of WHERE to do 4-on.   I really LOVE this style of 4-on for Jake because he has to plan ahead and reduce his momentum all the way down vs. with 2o2o, he would sometimes descend too fast and land hard into 2o2o which made me cringe years ago when I used to ask for a 2o2o.

Jake’s videos:

Lil’s running A-frame has been fast and consistent for a few years now.  The reason I decided to mess with it is because in NADAC, A-Frame ramps can be 8′ or 9′ long and Lil was not able to transition from one to the other without training a fair amount in-between, so after thinking about it on and off for the past 6 months, I decided to see if I could train a performance that would allow her to transition back and forth without any extra training in-between the two different A-frame ramp lengths.

I’m not sure what Lil’s end performance will look like on the A-Frame but I loved what I saw today.  I find it amazing that she only started showing me she is able to stop 4-on a couple of days ago yet today she made it look easy.  At this point, Lil often pops into a last minute and super soft 2020 when I’m ahead.  Although I have never asked Lil to do a 2o2o on the A-Frame, she has been doing 2o2o since puppy hood on a variety of objects, so its not surprising that she is offering it on the A-Frame, especially because it requires less effort than stopping 4-on.   But when I said WAIT, she was able to stop 4-on at the very bottom of the A-frame which impressed me.  I guess this tells me she really doesn’t know what MARK means on the A-frame… yet.

Once I feel she is anticipating stopping with 4-on , I might early release her most of the time.  Actually I might early release Jake sometimes too.   But these will be future decisions.  Right now I’m just enjoying seeing how quickly my dogs learned HOW to shift their weight back enough to be able to stop withe ease on a full-height A-frame…and the dog walk too.

Lil’s videos:

A Commercial Clicker Board

Looks like someone is manufacturing electronic clicker boards in Japan.  I personally prefer my homemade, low-tech clicker boards that use ordinary clickers but this new electronic version has a very low profile and it shows up on your doorstep ready to go.. no assembly required.   Those are both very enticing features!

In the video above, you can see that a stride regulator was added for the smaller terrier at 2:43 minutes.  I think its important to note that regardless of the props used, this small dog did not hit very deep in the contact zone.  I personally would not have added that stride regulator  because it forced unnatural extension and looked uncomfortable for him to do.  Also based on this particular dog’s style of running, I would not have begun practicing full-out running on a dog walk until he understood the end behavior I was looking for… intentional targeting near the end of the contact zone.   The end result of back-chaining like this would likely be a bit slower due to more strides on the dog walk but I think that would be more than balanced out by safety, reliability, and independence.

You can also see some leaping (rear feet together) vs. running (rear feet separation) by other dogs in the video above.  Clicker boards are great for communicating to dogs WHERE their feet are supposed to hit, but not HOW their feet are supposed to hit.  So using a clicker board (electronic or low-tech)  can produce different styles of foot targeting than  Silvia Trkman’s method, which focuses on CAPTURING running/ rear feet separation first and SHAPING lower hits over time.

Like my low-tech Clicker Board, this new electronic version will not train Running Contacts.  It will however mark the moment a dog’s feet hit inside the contact zone, which releases the handler from the responsibility of having to see and then mark that behavior in a timely fashion.

Below are links to earlier posts on my low-tech clicker boards if you want to build one vs. buy one.

https://artanddogblog.wordpress.com/2013/10/16/the-clicker-board-makes-training-running-contacts-a-breeze-with-perfectly-timed-clicks-every-rep/

https://artanddogblog.wordpress.com/2014/06/15/clicker-board-using-button-clickers-vs-box-clickers/

A sampling of Jake and Lil’s runs at last weekend’s trial

Mountain Dog Sports hosts GREAT trials.  The vibe is always positive and fun and last weekend’s trial was no exception.

I had one goal coming into this trial and it was that my dogs run with their usual gusto and focus in what I consider to be a very challenging environment for Terriers…. an active horse arena.   A little background……. Lil struggled the first time we trialed at this site  in October.    She lacked confidence and even lost focus a couple of times which is rare for her.  Surprisingly Jake ran pretty well in October.  He only checked into the Mouse Hotel in one corner of the arena once.. and gratefully he checked right back out after one or two JAAAAAAKE  HEREs!

So with the sole goal that my dogs run fast and focused, I decided to run with them a lot more than I usually do.  Not sure how they would have done had I used more distance (maybe just as well) but I was very pleased with how well they both ran… AND for all the Qs they racked up!

Lil ran 13 courses and Qed 10 of them.  Jake ran 10 courses and Qed 5 of them.   Jake also earned High in Trial for Open dogs.  I could not be more proud of how well both dogs ran.

What a fun way to spend a weekend!

The A-Frame is a Jumping Obstacle… for some dogs

Since a picture is worth a thousand words, I put together a composite that seems to support the notion that the A-frame is a jumping obstacle…. for some dogs at least.

It also answers the question: “Why do my dogs hit the A-frame so low?”

Answer: “They are not hitting the A-frame low. They are hitting it at the peak of their natural jumping arc.”

(top row) Jumping ON the A-frame, (2nd and 3rd rows) Jumping a 9" bar with 2 images rotated to match the A-frame angle, (4th row) Jumping OFF the A-frame-- images rotated so the down ramp is horizontal

(top row) Jumping ON the A-frame, (2nd and 3rd rows) Jumping a 9″ bar with 2 images rotated to match the A-frame angle, (4th row) Jumping OFF the A-frame– images rotated so the down ramp is horizontal

Lil is already jumping the equivalent of a 14 or 16 inch bar in order to hit the A-frame as high as she is hitting it, so I don’t think I can do much if anything that will significantly increase the height of her first hit.   But I believe I can soften the hit by training Lil (and Jake) to collect and power down a little before jumping onto the A-Frame.

(above) video that I grabbed screen saves from to create the composite image of Lil running over an A-Frame at the top of this post

I have a plan and have done a few preliminary sessions and I have say it looks very  promising.